Revolted Colonies

U.S. Politics and Culture

Category: 2016 U.S. Presidential election (Page 1 of 4)

Trading With The Frenemy

Rosenberg

Time was, colluding with Russia could get you killed; back when Russia was the USSR, our WWII ally, and the collusion was turning over an amateurish drawing of an atom bomb trigger. A drawing so bad that it was useless to the Soviets. So bad that it made my elementary school art look like masterworks  But it was enough to get Julius Rosenberg electrocuted. 

How things have changed. Three members of Future Ex-President Donald Trump’s campaign had an exchange by email and meetings with Russian diplomats and proxies. The stated purpose was to offer Russian assistance to beat Hillary Clinton.  Bring it on, the Trumpistas said, meeting up at Trump Tower right under Trump’s nose with an emissary from Putin, Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskaya.  

We don’t yet know the precise outcome of the meeting. We do know that the “dangle” offered by Russia was Russian help to attack Hillary Clinton with dirt dug up by Russia’s intelligence. We all know what happened eventually.  Russia carried out its cyber attack on Clinton and the Democrats to benefit Trump.  The only thing we don’t know is the price paid to the Russians for the boost.  My guess is that it’s a bit more valuable than a lousy drawing. It’s also my guess that none of the Trump operatives will ever see the inside of a jail cell. 

Let me say it before you do – How stupid can I be to compare a little political gamesmanship with giving away atomic secrets?  So let’s break it down. The Soviets were our ally when Rosenberg was an atomic spymaster.   By 1950 it was our existential Cold War enemy. McCarthyism was at its peak. Bad timing for the Rosenbergs. There’s no excuse for his espionage but nobody but the Rosenbergs were executed for acts taken in peacetime. 

Trump Jr., Kushner and Manafort’s actions crossed the same line. Even if they, like Julius Rosenberg, thought the Russians were friends, not enemies, at the least they were so reckless and craven to consider undermining our Presidential election, by dealing with a foreign power. Maybe Junior is too stupid to know better. Kushner and Manafort knew better.  Kushner’s repeated falsifications on his security clearance declarations show his guilty knowledge. 

If you think that comparing Rosenberg and the Trump syndicate is a false equivalence, you’re misjudging how destructive it is to let Russia hijack the integrity of our elections and how dangerous it is for Trump’s son and son-in-law to open themselves to potential blackmail. It’s as destructive as the A-bomb to the survival of the American republic. 

What a Difference a Day Makes?

Hillary Clinton sat with Christine Amanpour of CNN recently for a lengthy interview about the campaign. In advance of her book about the 2016 election due out this fall, Clinton took responsibility for a flawed campaign. However, she insisted  that the statement made by James Comey, FBI director, on October 28, 2016, effectively turned the election against her.  Comey announced that the FBI capture of a trove of Clinton email from her aide’s laptop  would cause an extension of the investigation. 

The year 2016 may be mentioned along with  years  when the political culture of the world shifted almost in a chain reaction. It may be a year that symbolizes an epoch. Brexit, the ascendancy of Trump, and the as yet unknown fate of the French presidency are keynotes in what shapes up as a turn toward authoritarianism. With that overview, it is awfully hard to say that Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign foundered on a single day, even one so freighted with significance.

According to most reliable  polling experts she was ahead in the two weeks before the election. James Comey’s announcement of an ongoing investigation of her email disrupted the beltway and made headlines running straight up to Election Day. Clinton has good reason to think that the announcement changed minds, but whose and how many? 

It’s not clear though that Comey’s announcement changed enough minds to alter the election result. She also blames Russian intrigue but its reach and effect are still being measured. In any case, the race was close, too close to call decisively especially as voting began.  There were many other reasons why votes might have slipped away from the clearly more qualified candidate.

The authors of Shattered, a history of the 2016 Clinton campaign, argue that dysfunction in the campaign itself, caused in part by the candidate, doomed the enterprise. They nevertheless suggest many other reasons, beyond the campaign’s control, why Hillary Clinton’s fate was sealed. This election will employ historians for generations, assuming of course that History is not repealed by Executive Order.

A Wall? Maybe a Fence…

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All Bricked Up

If Humpty Dumpty tumbles off Donald Trump’s wall, he may not have much of a fall. The President-elect has diminished the scale of the wall he pledged to build along our border with Mexico. There will be some portions of wall, but also some stretches of fence.  When fences won’t work, maybe he’ll try a few traffic cones. Or a crossing guard. Trump has reminded us quite early that his promises and proposals were only suggestions.  He is walking back his first and most famous promise –  the Great Wall of Arizona. Trump left his Friday meeting with President Obama looking ashen, his florid orange cast turned a washed-out gray. His shoulders are slumping from their usual military school bearing.  The Oval Office surely aged him, and he does not occupy it yet. 

Modest Proposals

Trump readily admits now that he boasted many outrageous plans in his campaign solely to get elected. He didn’t plan to undertake many of the things he proposed or even to win, for that matter.  He was surprised to escape the gravitational force of  the primaries and planned to throw his support to Chris Christie. At the time of the convention, his son approached John Kasich to offer him effective control of the government in a Trump-Kasich administration.  Trump fancied himself in more of a ceremonial role, like a Greeter at a Trump Casino.

A Tired Tycoon

The realities of the toughest job in the world have quickly borne down on him.  The robust 70 year-old globetrotter has looked distinctly low energy. Asked about Obamacare after leaving his Oval Office meeting, he observed that some parts of the health plan were worth keeping, Trump-speak for pieces that cannot be removed without catastrophic impact. You can’t reinstate the pre-existing condition exclusion without replacing the coverage because no insurance carrier will carry those high-risk cases voluntarily — or affordably. The health plan Trump characterized as a disaster, he now finds that he can’t easily get away from it. In fact, he had to admit that parts of this disaster were actually worth keeping. 

Mixed Messages

Some other early flip-flops: He’s making himself available to the press again. He’s receptive to coaching  from President Obama, his nemesis. He considers same-sex marriage settled law and won’t go after it.  

To be sure, Trump hasn’t retreated from nominating a Supreme Court Judge who is openly pro-life. He intends immediately deport undocumented immigrants with a criminal record. He’s chosen Steve Bannon as his chief strategist, a man aligned with White Nationalism and the racial and ethnic hatred in which it traffics. Reince Priebus, the GOP party chairman, has been elected to the all-powerful chief of staff position. Neither Trump, Bannon nor Priebus has held a government post of any kind.

One week after the November Surprise, we don’t know much more about Trump’s true plans and beliefs. It is clear, however, that he is a man sobered by the sudden realization that running a government is a monumental undertaking, one which he did not expect.

© 2016 The Revolted Colonies

So, What Do You Really Think?

The warning signs were there from the beginning that this was going to be a watershed year. Donald Trump, President-Elect, buzzed through a crowded field of mostly experienced politicians to emerge as the Republican standard-bearer. We could chalk it up to the asymmetry of the field or the brawling of primary politics or an aberration caused by conflating reality and TV.  Now that Trump has won the White House,  his victory, still shocking, is more understandable. 

The country is almost evenly divided between people who reject the empowerment of the federal government as a positive force and those who embrace it.  Trump embodies the former and Clinton the latter.  Trump had a clear vision of his following — he could shoot someone on Fifth Avenue in broad daylight and he would not lose his support.  Sexual assault, race-baiting, tax dodging, swindling: none of it mattered because he thumbed his nose at the System. Now he will be the System, until he dismantles it.

Take Trump at his word. He will build a wall. He will get Mexico to pay for it. He will close our borders. He will start sending bills to our allies. He will tip all the sacred cows.  If you like alternate history, this will be a field day. There will be an iconoclast — a vengeful, petty, litigious one — as Commander-in-Chief. Nothing is unthinkable.

 © 2016 The Revolted Colonies

It Used To Be Called Election Fatigue

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A few of us came voluntarily but most were coerced.  My wife and parents cornered me the night after the second debate. They told me that I was obsessed. I didn’t know the date or my children’s names. They kept at it long enough to convince me that I was in trouble. I’d neglected my health and hygiene. I was taking meals sporadically, they said, confronting me with piles of half-eaten sandwiches that were rotting on my desk; coffee cups stacked up in the car console.  I was sleeping two hours at a time, awake through most nights, afraid to close my eyes.  The kids were terrified, asking my wife what was wrong with me. 

  That did it. I broke down, babbling uncontrollably. My wife calmed me until an SUV arrived. Two EMTs extracted me from the house, with nothing but an overnight bag my wife had packed. I was given some kind of sedative and fell dead away. 

 I awoke, still goofy, afloat on a sea of identical beds in a barn-like, white room. The room I later learned was previously occupied by a drug store chain. It was flooded with artificial light and silent though full of people. I recognized the hum of white noise, an ambient background, all but blotting out the random car horn blaring outside. 

I sat up and looked around. I was in a ward of fifty or so beds, scattered  through the store.  My bed was in the row where magazines used to be kept .  I stood up slowly, relieved that I was not under restraint. As I walked around, I noticed that the ward was filled with political junkies.  They looked zonked out. Some I recognized: reporters, commentators and analysts, but also people like me.   I haven’t seen any anchors here yet.  But they just read the news, they don’t have to understand it.  We’re all under observation for post-traumatic stress disorder. This is what my old counselor calls election fatigue. In his day this wasn’t considered an illness. Now it’s PTSD, DSM 309.81. I once was a concerned citizen. Now I’m a diagnosis. 

 We’re free to walk around and talk about anything but the election. Bailey is in the bed next to me, with the covers pulled up. He’s been under there for hours. I suspect he’s writing: journaling or  taking notes. It’s forbidden, and he doesn’t want to get caught because he’ll be forced to leave. This is his second stint, and his insurance won’t pay for another. He’d had a meltdown when Kerry was swift-boated. Don’t misunderstand. He would be happy to leave but his family won’t take him back unless he can stay clean.

Galt is walking up and down the aisles of beds. It seems like she’s talking to herself, saying the same thing over and over.  Galt’s really gone, I think, until I realize that she’s memorizing a column. She’s been mumbling the same thing all day. Then she moves on to new rantings.  Two orderlies return her to bed. She sobs that she’s on deadline. Poor soul. 

  Each day brings the possibility of a new patient and with it news of the campaigns.  There are no phones, television or newspapers and definitely no internet. We are locked away without the faintest sense of what has happened since we were extracted.  When somebody new arrives, the rest of us gather around until a guard disperses us. They try to  minimize the private discussions between patients. It doesn’t matter.  One newbie says he’s up by a point, and another says that he’s down by five. One says New Hampshire’s a lock but at the same time another says it’s in play. Too much conflicting information is like no information at all.

We have group meetings once a day. The idea is so we don’t think it’s just us who are suffering.  There is a new patient with us. Her name is Derry, and she was hosting Talk Radio.  At first, she was a casual listener, but she  couldn’t take the nonsense she was hearing and became a caller.  Soon she was a regular — “Derry from Winston-Salem” — phoning in to argue. She started making things up: Hillary is having closed-door meetings with John Kasich…Trump took an option on the U.N…All Chrysler 300 owners are forming a voting bloc.  The audience loved it, so the station put her on the air. Then she spun completely out of control.  When she accused the network of funding the Militia Movement, it was over for her. 

Every day I meet individually with Andrew, my counselor. The point is to help me figure out what made me go haywire.  I have a vivid recollection of the intervention but the campaign is a blur. I could remember many events and sound bytes, but I cannot put them in order or make sense of them.  Andrew is an elderly African-American man. He’s great at therapy talk — “When I say that, how does that make you feel?” — but he’s a good guy. He seems to be a little jangly himself. I wonder if he’ll end up in one of the beds at some point.

I ask Andrew how long I will be here, and he says that I can walk out any time I want. I realize, though, that I don’t want to leave. It’s quiet and orderly and safe. I’m at peace here, and frankly, I’m scared to go back out there. Andrew says that the ward will shut down after the votes are counted and a winner is declared.

 Bailey and Galt are talking. They’re scared too and don’t want to leave. 
 
“Even after the election?” I ask.
 
“Especially after the election,” they say.
 

©  2016 The Revolted Colonies

 

 

 

Tapped Out and Brassed Off: No More Donations

Money in politics

I’m on a first-name basis with Barack, Michelle, Joe, Hillary, Chelsea, Senator Al (Franken), somebody named Jess and somebody else named Nick.  All my new BFFs write to me, some of them every day to tell me about their opponents’ character defects, and they always ask for money. Not a lot, $5.00 here, $25.00 there, or $50.00 if someone is really sore aggrieved about something.  Lately it’s been about the FBI, but it’s mostly about Donald Trump.  And there’s always a deadline, a crisis, a one-stroke-of-midnight tone to these messages. I wasn’t ready for these desperate pleas for support. I thought that’s what families were for.

Work for (a) Change 

Every time there is a tick in one of the polls, the Clinton campaign turns that tick into a nick for cash.  “Ohio’s up? Help us seal the deal! Ohio’s down? Help us save the U.S. as we know it!” We’re a week away from Election Day.  As of September 30th, Clinton had $385M cash on hand compared to $40M for Trump. Her campaign and its affiliates took in $101M through October 19th, while Trump raised $29M during the same period. Clinton had $62M on hand. On the other hand, Trump had to kick in $31M of his own money to keep the doors open —and he never invests his own money. With a week to go, they’re still spending and whining about money. Frankly, my dears, I don’t give a damn.

The Clinton campaign has been going on for two years. Democrat-affiliate Super-Pacs have been at it even longer.  I contributed to Bernie (“$27.00 —would you like a receipt?”). When Bernie folded, I backed Hillary, even though I am not an ardent supporter.  But seriously, does it ever stop?

The Politics Industry

The answer is No, it doesn’t. Political fundraising is perpetual.  After Obama won, fundraising continued without stopping for a breath. “Support the Agenda.” Then it was issue-driven, against Citizens United, among other things. Now, we get Super-PAC fundraising to limit Super-PAC fundraising? Only in America.

What do you call a perpetual campaign? you call it an industry. Politics for both parties is a business, and together they form an industry. After all, if campaigns were limited to 60–90 days, all the pros would have nothing to do the rest of the time. Pollsters, organizers, lawyers, accountants, and policy wonks would be cashiered. Our contributions keep the politics industry rolling. Our campaign system is a retort to anyone who says that politicians don’t create jobs. They create jobs for themselves. 

None of this fundraising is illegal. In fact, in our end-stage capitalist nation, it is the official language of politics. The Supreme Court said so itself in Citizens United. When I give money to a campaign, I’m not just speaking; I’m also investing, but I have no voice in how the company is run. I don’t get stock, interest or dividends. 

Brassed Off

The only thing I can do is to cap my investment, which is what I’ve done. So, Barack, Michelle, Joe, Hillary, Chelsea, Al, Jess and Nick: I’m turning off the spigot. No more money for 2016. I’m tapped out. But by all means, write to me next year when you’ve got your first quarterly report, and I’ll decide if your company’s prospects look good.

© 2016 The Revolted Colonies. Reprinted with permission.

Politics as Unusual: The FBI, The Bundy Verdict and The Comey Letter

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FBI director James Comey had a lousy week, and next week is not looking any better.  A trial jury in Oregon told him that his G-Men were off-base thinking that armed seizure of a federal bird sanctuary constituted a crime when the panel acquitted the Bundy Gang of conspiracy, gun and other charges. Comey took refuge in Anthony Weiner’s underwear, but they’re not fitting as planned.

Bad Day at the Bird Bath

img_1441The Bundy Gang didn’t walk away. There are other charges against them still pending.  The acquittal was not a blanket exoneration. Still, it will force the Bureau to reconsider its policy in dealing with armed anti-government resistance.  J. Edgar Hoover must be spinning in his grave. 

img_1443The shooting at Ruby Ridge, Idaho in 1992 and the siege and shootout in Waco, Texas in 1993 had previously put the FBI under scrutiny in its encounters with the Militia Movement, of which the Bundys are a part. The verdict handcuffs the Bureau in protecting federal land from armed opposition.  The next step, unfortunately, would be to call up the National Guard. which may be precisely what the Bundys want.

Rifling Through the Underwear Drawer

img_1448The day after the Bundy acquittal and without any apparent connection to it, Comey sent Congress a letter stating that the FBI was reading newly discovered Hillary Clinton emails from a cache recovered a month ago from a laptop it seized from Weiner.  The laptop was shared by the former Congressman and his soon-to-be ex-wife, Huma Abedin, a top aide to the President-in-Waiting. Weiner is under investigation for conducting an online sexual relationship with a minor.

Even though the FBI has had Weiner’s laptop for a month and presumably has known about the emails for as long, allegedly it hasn’t gotten around to reading them.  So, the FBI hasn’t determined if these emails are new discoveries or copies of emails previously recovered.

Nevertheless, Comey thought it necessary to inform Congress of the find. In July, Comey announced that the FBI had found no basis to recommend criminal charges against former Secretary of State Clinton, arising out of her use of a private email server. He then scolded her publicly for mishandling classified material.   Comey came under fire for this ex-officio comment.

Crossing The Boss

img_1447Now, Comey is on the hot seat again. He went against Attorney General Loretta Lynch’s direction not to issue the inflammatory letter adding nothing of substance to the case against Clinton, eleven days before Election Day. The FBI reports to Lynch’s Justice Department. Yet, Comey said that he felt obligated to inform Congress of this newish discovery. Comey’s action may well be grounds for dismissal. Given Lynch’s own political problem over her June  airport meeting with Bill Clinton, creating an appearance of impropriety in connection with the email server issue, she was in no position to block Comey and is in no position to fire him.  

Comey Unchained

Nevertheless, Comey’s feeling of obligation is badly misguided. The emails have not been examined. Right now, they are not evidence—they are data. It is against law enforcement policy to discuss on open investigation of any kind.If Clinton was not running for President in an upcoming election, you can bet that Comey would not even have thought about it. The FBI would continue its investigation and report its findings to DOJ, which then would make a decision as to prosecution.

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Even if he had an obligation to update Congress, his action was premature and knowingly prejudicial. It would be understandable if the FBI had determined that the emails were newly discovered material, containing a “Classified” marking and being sent to or from Clinton’s private server.  Then the Bureau could report something meaningful had been found and that further classification review by other agencies would be required. Until then, it should have remained an internal matter for the Bureau; especially because classified material might involve matters of national security.  

Comey has painted himself into a corner. If the emails are innocuous, he should not have raised it at all. If they involved  classified material, he can’t disclose them but clearly has opened that door. He’s prejudiced the election as well as a potential prosecution.  Clinton along with others accuses Comey of a political hatchet job.  Try as one might, the political aspect is impossible to dismiss.

© 2016 The Revolted Colonies

One for the Congressional Records

lets-work-together1With Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway admitting that the sky  is blue after all, Hillary Clinton’s triumph  is a fait accompli.  The Clinton machine may plug on, attempting to turn red states blue, stacking up a record to rival landslides past.  It would be a waste of time and energy.  If she does not need Arizona, Georgia or Utah to capture 270 electoral votes, she should turn her attention – and war chest – first to the Senate and then to the House. Therein lies the fate of her first term.

Piling up an electoral record would be nice, but it will have an asterisk because of her opponent. Trump was not a Republican long enough to be considered an apostate.  He is an aberration. No matter how big the electoral victory, Clinton is not receiving a mandate from the voters.  Her boosters will be braying, her nose-holding voters sighing with relief, and the #NoHRC contingent gnashing their teeth and engineering her downfall. Assuming that her detractors can sort themselves out well enough for concerted action.

Be assured that the detractors will be sufficient in number to defeat Clinton’s legislative agenda if they are united.  That’s why the Democrats should turn  energy and funding to Congressional races.  Numerical control of the Senate doesn’t guarantee de facto control, due to the Senate Rules. But the Senate sets new rules when a new Congress is called into session, and the majority is critical for setting those rules.  The Rules will  place the Senate in a position to push through needed appointments.  The Supreme Court is the most pressing concern. There are many others.  Clinton will have a lot of bargaining chips. If she plays them wisely she might get what she needs, even if it is not exactly what she wants.

Prognosticators say that Democrats will not win a House majority. Given the rift in the GOP, a large plurality may be enough to build a coalition on fiscal issues. The Members and the White House must be ready to horse-trade, as it used to be done. Pork is back in fashion. If members protect their districts and trade votes to accomplish that end, everyone can go home equally unhappy.  That’s good politics.

It’s not up to Hillary alone.  The Republican shakeout from their Lost Weekend is still uncertain.  Trump will most likely reject the party brand and drag his constituents off to a political Jonestown.  The rump, what’s left of the old GOP, will have to decide if it wants to be a major party. If so, it must be willing to work with Democrats. If it chooses to continue the politics of No, it will not be a majority party in the House much longer.

HRC needs Congress, and she knows it.  Let’s see if she’s smart and skilled enough to play for a working majority rather than an illusory coronation.

 

Trump Accusers Are Raising Consciousness

  New accusations from Trump accusers are coming fast now, separate accusations being published Wednesday in the Palm Beach Post and the New York Times.  If not for confidentiality agreements routinely used to gag contestants and staffers, more accusations of criminal behavior would have been leveled at Trump by now, and there is still three weeks to go.

The outpouring of stories has an effect beyond the election.  Women are expressing gratitude for the women coming forward because these stories are revealing  deeper truths about the powerlessness women experience. The assault is momentary and in many cases women can prevent the incident from escalating.  What they can’t do often is to report it, speak up about it, out the attacker.  A young woman subjected to aggressive sexual behavior often is told directly that “it never happened” or that if she speaks of it, she will be punished. Her career derailed.  

In anti-discrimination law, this is a hostile working environment. These claims are especially tough to make when it’s caused or endorsed by the big boss.  Young women in new or first jobs  are given the Hobson’s Choice of calling out a powerful man and facing retaliation and ostracism, or remaining silent, which most of the traumatized women choose to do. 

Keeping silent is an extension of the feeling of powerlessness.  There is no release  from that feeling, so it takes hold psychically. The feeling of powerlessness becomes deeply ingrained and has a negative impact beyond the workplace. 

The Trump scandals, like the Clinton scandals before them, have presented opportunities to teach boys and girls, adolescents and young adults, that predatory sexual behavior often is criminal. Its victims no longer need to be resigned to shame, silence and a feeling of being ineffectual. Boys learn that a parent, sibling, friend or lover may have been victimized and that they may have experienced life-altering consequences. 

October is the Cruelest Month

octoberHillary Clinton supporters have cowered in dread that Donald Trump or the Republicans would unleash an October Surprise that would bring down her candidacy.  The surprise that Hillary now dreads is that her opponent will be drummed out of the Presidential campaign before she beats him like a rented mule.  David Fehrenholdt, a Washington Post reporter, disclosed an audio outtake from a 2005 Access:Hollywood appearance, in which Trump boasts about trying to bed one of the show’s former hostesses and using his star power to grope and assault women who cross his path. The audio was followed by a video showing Trump doing just that, with an attractive soap opera star.

Shortly after midnight, he aired a 90-second statement that fell short of a sincere apology. Trump denied that the audio portrayed the real Donald Trump. Then he shifted to an attack on Bill Clinton, which he threatened to continue in the Sunday debate.

Condemnation of Trump’s statements is near universal.  Trump lap-dog Corey Lewandowski dismissed the furor over Trump’s statements. America is looking for a leader, he said. “We’re not electing a Sunday School teacher,” he said.  Don’t tell that to the evangelicals, who were hanging in by their fingernails. They will run away from Trump after this morally reprehensible performance.  

Trump’s first reaction was to offer an apology “if anyone was offended.” Then he added that Bill Clinton has said “far worse on the golf course. Not even close.”  Nobody is accepting this dismissive statement as an apology.  Trump is holed up in his tower, waiting for Reince Priebus to descend upon him wearing his cloak and carrying his scythe.    Trump said that Reince is coming for debate prep. Its possible that Reince will leave with a reddish-blond haired scalp.

All of the tribal chieftains have slammed him: Ryan, McConnell, Priebus. Jon Huntsman has said that Pence should replace Trump as the candidate.   It would be a shock if they were not talking about forcing him out of the race.  They can’t kick him out but they can make it too unpleasant for him to continue.   It wouldn’t have been a shocker if he skipped the debate this Sunday – he’s already decided to cancel his scheduled appearance in Wisconsin tomorrow.  But Ben Ginsberg, preeminent election lawyer and former counsel to the Bush and Romney campaigns, gave the GOP little chance of salvaging the election by replacing Trump as a candidate.  

Trump was having a lousy week before this audio became public. Newsweek ran a detailed story of Trump’s business failures; how Trump’s businesses failed again and again. The story of Trump’s pattern of  buying state attorney generals to get them to drop investigations against him or his businesses. The Atlantic, a magazine that his given only two earlier Presidential endorsements in its 160 year history (to Lincoln in 1860  and against Goldwater in 1964), came out against Trump today. New York’s attorney general shut down the Trump Foundation.  Many Republican House candidates have officially withdrawn their endorsements, and the list is growing.

Trump’s candidacy is all but done. One October question remaining is whether he will cause the GOP to lose the Senate and to drop its large majority in the House. The only other question is how much uglier will this campaign get before it’s over.

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